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How to recycle your household batteries

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Recycle your batteries 

Did you know that up to 90% of the materials in batteries can be recycled? But because they also contain hazardous materials, they cannot go in any of our household bins. Here’s why and how to recycle your batteries safely, so that together we can drive batteries out of our bins and landfill, and back into materials that can be re-used.

It is important to keep your batteries separated and not put them in any bin. This includes alkaline batteries such as those used for gaming consoles, torches, some remote controls and small electonic toys as well as batteries in laptops, mobile phones, power tools and cameras. Rechargeable batteries and lithium ion batteries are hazardous and could produce sparks that could start a fire in our trucks or at the recycling facility.

Materials such as lead, cadmium, mercury, lithium, uranium, manganese, nickel and zinc are used to make batteries. These materials are all non-renewable, can be recycled an indefinite number of times. Recycling these materials is a more sustainable option reducing the reliance on new materials by reusing those materials already in circulation. 

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 banner for schools battery blitz
Register Your School for the Big Battery Blitz.

With only 3% of Australia's batteries being recycled annually, we're reaching out to schools to help us make battery recycling easier so more batteries are driven out of our bins and into our battery recycling systems!  

The Big Battery Blitz schools challenge is open to all Primary and Secondary schools in the Port Macquarie-Hastings region and will be running from 15th February – 15th March 2021. 

Download the Big Battery Blitz School Info sheet for all the details. 

Register your school below. Once registered, a member of our Education team will be in touch to organise delivery of your challenge pack which includes everything your school needs to jump on board! 

Big-Battery-Blitz-Terms-Conditions.pdf

For all enquiries, please contact Jenna O’Connell, Education Officer: 

Jenna.oconnell@pmhc.nsw.gov.au 

(02) 6581 8128 

 

Click here to view form.

It is important to keep your batteries separated and not put them in any bin. You can use an empty box you already have (be sure to label it so it’s stored and used correctly) or you can pick up a free reusable Battery Recycling Box from one of Council's Customer Service Counters, or fill out the form below and we will send you one.  Watch this video on how to put together your Battery Recycling Box. 

Click here to view form.

Batteries, in household quantities, can be dropped off for reycling at your local Waste Transfer Station in Port Macquarie, Wauchope, Kew, Comboyne or Cairncross.

Some Officeworks and Aldi stores also accept certain household batteries for recycling. Check their websites for locations and the types of batteries accepted. 

You can also drop off your batteries in household quantities in the designated collection points at Council offices at

  • Port Macquarie - 17 Burrawan Street
  • Wauchope - 49 High Street
  • Laurieton - 9 Laurie Street

CRC-station-Customer-Service_1.jpg

Batteries that can be dropped off for free include: 

  • Batteries from household devices:
    • AA, AAA, C, and D cell batteries
    • alkaline cell
    • lithium
    • 9-volt
    • Cr123 camera batteries
    • dry cell and zinc
    • Li-ion batteries (from laptops, cameras, cell phones and tools)
    • NiCd
    • NiMH
    • gel cell
    • most damaged, leaking or rusty batteries

 

Recycling is a more environmentally friendly and much safer way to dispose of your household batteries. Most batteries contain hazardous materials and can pollute the environment when disposed of in landfills or when thrown out elsewhere. Materials like lead, cadmium and mercury can poison animals and contaminate soils and water, and they stay in the environment for a long time.

Recycling batteries correctly not only avoids this sort of damage to the environment, but also puts spent batteries back into good use. Materials such as lead, cadmium, mercury, lithium, uranium, manganese, nickel and zinc are used to make batteries. These materials are all non-renewable, yet can be recycled an indefinite number of times.

Recycling these materials is a more sustainable option, reducing the reliance on new materials by reusing those materials already in circulation. You might have heard this being referred to as the circular economy - an economic system aimed at eliminating waste and the continual use of resources.

Currently, Australia is only recycling around 3% of household batteries each year. Given the risks of not recycling and the benefits for, it’s time we change these stats, and you can be a part of the change! Click below to see how.

 

Please follow these important steps: 

  • Store your battery box in a dry and cool place, away from reach of young children 
  • Tape (electrical/duct/packing) the terminals of any 9V and lithium batteries 
  • Do not put leaking or damaged/rusted batteries in your box. These should be placed in a clear zip lock bag and dropped off for free at your local waste transfer station 
  • Always wash your hands after handling batteries 

For more information on safe battery recycling, head to https://batteryrecycling.org.au/

 

 

There are other things that just don’t belong in our household bins, but can also be dropped off for free at your local waste transfer station. For a full list, head to our Drop Off For Free page.

 

 

 

This page was last updated on: 02 February 2021